Trinity Hall

| University of Cambridge

Trinity Hall, Cambridge

Trinity Hall, Cambridge was founded in 1350. It teaches in the region of 176 undergraduate students and 196 graduates. The college is ranked in position 3 of 29 in the Tompkins Table of academic results for the year 2014 (where 1 is the top possible score). It is located around 0.11 km from the centre of town.

Courses offered [ + ] Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic | Archaeology & Anthropology | Architecture | Asian and Middle Eastern Studies | Chemical Engineering | Classics | Computer Science | Economics | Engineering | English | Geography | History | History of Art | Human, Social and Political Sciences | Land Economy | Law | Linguistics | Management Studies | Manufacturing Engineering | Mathematics | Medicine | Medicine Graduate Course | Modern & Medieval Languages | Music | Natural Sciences | Philosophy | Psychological and Behavioural Sciences | Theology & Religious Studies | Veterinary Medicine | (additional courses are often available to post-graduate students and many colleges offer complex arrangements of modern languages - please see our courses page for details )

http://www.trinhall.cam.ac.uk/ | locate on map

We might be less famous than trinity but what we lack in size we make up for in really nice people and awesome buildings/scenery. Tit hall (as it invariably ends up getting called) is on the backs right in the middle of town - but is tucked away a little bit so isn't too crowded. Admittedly everyone knows everyone else's business here but that's probably the price you pay for living in a really supportive, closely knit sort of environment.

The accommodation for first and third years is really good, but second years get a slightly more raw deal and have to cycle about ten minutes away.

There are loads of clubs and sports to get into and we punch above our weight in lots of ways!

Study (3), Artiness (4), Sport (3), Music (2), Facilities (3), Accommodation (4), Smugness (2)

Review by Leone - Biochemist (August 26, 2009) - add your impression